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NWU Law House Style Referencing Guide

Based on the NWU Faculty of Law House Style.

Law sources

General

(a) Different kinds of sources are published on the Internet. An Internet source is a source that is exclusively available on the Internet, for example websites and blogs. (Published books found on the Internet are still books and should be cited as such. Documents, such as reports, that are available on the Internet, but are not websites or blogs, should be cited as "Other literature resources".)

(b) Internet addresses must be typed in black and should not be underlined. Please do not make use of hyperlinks when citing an Internet address.

(c) All scholarly journal articles, books, legislation, case law, international law instruments or any other source that have been accessed via an online database should not be cited as Internet sources but as journal articles, case law and so forth.

Notes for citing Internet sources in footnotes

(a) As a general rule, the following information must be provided in footnotes: (a) the author (company, organisation or institution or the surname of an individual); (b) date of publication or creation; and (c) the Internet address (URL) from where the source was accessed:

EXAMPLE

Footnote
1 Clarkson 1998 http://webjcli.ncl.ac.uk.
or
2 Department of Labour 2009 http://www.labour.gov/doc/health.

(b) Authors’ initials are omitted in footnote references but must appear in the bibliography.

(c) When the author’s surname or the date of publication or creation is not known it should be indicated as such by means of "Anon" and "date unknown".

Notes for citing Internet sources in the bibliography

(a) As a general rule, the following information must be provided in the bibliography: (a) the author (company, organisation or institution, or the surname and initials of an individual); (b) date of publication or creation; (c) the name of the web-page or the title of the document cited from, or the title of a posting on a blog or social network site (in italics); (d) Internet address from where the source was accessed; and (e) the date on which the source was accessed.

EXAMPLE

Bibliography (under the heading "Internet sources")
Clarkson CMV 1998 Culpability http://webjcli.ncl.ac.uk accessed 21 May 2009
or
Department of Labour 2009 Health and Safety Issues  http://www.labour.gov/doc/health accessed 25 November 2010

(b) When the author’s surname or the date of publication or creation is not known it should be indicated in the bibliography as such by means of "Anonymous" and "date unknown".

(c) In the bibliography all Internet sources must be preceded by the abbreviated reference as per the footnote reference.